In "The Dead Don't Die," an amusingly droll and deadpan comedy, the zombie apocalypse is welcomed with bemusement rather than terror. It's more of a curiosity than a catastrophe.

No one runs from the ghouls. They saunter. They mosey. It's all very laid back and cool. That's because this movie is written and directed by the laid back and cool Jim Jarmusch - a filmmaker far more interested in creating mood than being in a hurry to move a plot forward. His vampire movie - "Only Lovers Left Alive" in 2013 - featured two vampires playing chess, chatting about existentialism, listening to alt rock, and eating blood popcicles. (It's fantastic, by the way).
 
"The Dead Don't Die" isn't as sharp, but has a bit more action and blood splatter because the genre demands it - but again, it's all handled with a shrug of the shoulders. The ensemble cast is very game for this kind of delivery. Bill Murray and Adam Driver take dry humor to Sahara levels, and Chloe Sevigny is the only one acting like she's in a horror movie. 
 
That's the other thing: the movie is hyper-meta, where some characters know they're in a movie. There's even a running joke about the movie's opening credits theme song by Sturgill Simpson. 
 
What's the point of it all? Well, Jarmusch is using the slow-moving but inevitably destructive zombies and the characters' nonchalant reaction to them as a metaphor for the threat of climate change and the public's general carelessness. It's clever, but sloppy at times, and the movie just kind of ends when Jarmusch is done goofing around. But I'm here for it. And the final line of dialogue puts a very fine point on the satire to drive it home.
 
 RATING: * * * 1/2
 

RATING SCALE

* * * * * Incredible - One of the best of the year
* * * * Excellent - Touches greatness with only minor quibbles
* * * Good - Plenty to like, definitely worth seeing
* * Mediocre - You can do better
* Awful - The worst, an insult to movies