By Cassandra Pollock, Texas Tribune

The Texas House General Investigating Committee voted Monday to request that the Texas Rangers look into allegations against House Speaker Dennis Bonnen and one of his top lieutenants in the lower chamber.

The committee vote, which was unanimous, followed roughly an hour of closed-door deliberations among the five House members who serve on the panel. At issue is whether Bonnen, an Angleton Republican, and state Rep. Dustin Burrows, R-Lubbock, offered hardline conservative activist Michael Quinn Sullivan media credentials for his organization in exchange for politically targeting a list of fellow GOP members in the 2020 primaries.

Sullivan, who met with Bonnen and Burrows at the Texas Capitol in June, publicized his allegations against the two Republicans over two weeks ago — and later revealed he had secretly recorded the meeting. Since then, Bonnen has forcefully pushed back against Sullivan’s account of that June 12 meeting and has called on him to release the full audio. Burrows has not publicly weighed in. Other Republicans who have listened to the recording have said it largely confirms Sullivan's allegations against Bonnen and Burrows.

The state agency said in an email Monday that it was looking into The Texas Tribune's inquiry about whether the Texas Rangers planned to open an investigation into the matter.

A spokesperson for Bonnen, meanwhile, said the speaker "fully supports the committee's decision and has complete faith in the House rules and committee process working as they are intended."

State Rep. Morgan Meyer, a Dallas Republican who chairs the House committee, said Monday that the Texas Rangers' Public Integrity Unit “will conduct an investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding” that meeting between Sullivan, Bonnen and Burrows. Meyer also requested that the Texas Rangers provide a copy of its final investigative report to the committee at the end of its investigation.

The Texas Rangers' Public Integrity Unit has jurisdiction over investigating alleged crimes by state officers and state employees. The unit was created in 2015 after the Texas Legislature passed a measure creating it as a branch within the Texas Rangers, which operates under the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Meyer closed the meeting by saying that "any investigation should follow the facts and the evidence without regard to political consideration."

Last week, state Rep. Nicole Collier, a Fort Worth Democrat who serves as vice chair of the House General Investigating Committee, had sent a letter to Meyer requesting an investigation into allegations made against the speaker and Burrows. Meyer responded later that afternoon, saying that he had recently "initiated internal discussion" with committee staff about the procedure for launching an investigation.


Quality journalism doesn't come free. 

Perhaps it goes without saying — but producing quality journalism isn't cheap. At a time when newsroom resources and revenue across the country are declining, The Texas Tribune remains committed to sustaining our mission: creating a more engaged and informed Texas with every story we cover, every event we convene and every newsletter we send. As a nonprofit newsroom, we rely on members to help keep our stories free and our events open to the public. Do you value our journalism? Show us with your support.